College Goals is Traveling to Paris and London in March!

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What do families need to know for success in the university search and application process? Why are American standardized tests so important in the application process and where do you find professional support? How do you make all your preparations come together in a strong US university application? Given the unique demands of the American university application process, students are well advised to begin preparing earlier in their high school career than most international students do. College Goals’ counselors will address the complexities of the American university application system, with special attention to the process and mechanics. They will also take questions about applications to the US, UK, and Canada.

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All events are free of charge.  Seating is limited.

Given how late international students frequently approach the American application process, we particularly urge families with students in Years 10 or 11, Troisième or Seconde, or Grades 9 or 10 to attend one of these sessions and to begin thoughtful and informed consideration of their higher education options now, prior to when their student starts A-Levels, Pre-Us, French BAC or IB coursework.

About our Experts

Andrea van Niekerk was born in South Africa, and was educated there and in the US. She served as Associate Director of Admission and freshman academic adviser at Brown University for over a decade. In the six years since moving to the West Coast where she now lives on the Stanford campus, Andrea has continued to work with American and international families.

Jilly Warner was born in the UK and educated there, in France and in Austria. She has almost two decades of combined experience in university admission, as Coordinator of International Admission at the University of Vermont and as an independent counsellor. She now counsels domestic and international students from many parts of the world.

College Goals is a highly qualified university admission consulting practice specializing in counseling families interested in higher education opportunities in the US and the UK. The team of four counselors collectively offers many decades of professional experience in higher education as university administrators, admission officers, educators and academic advisors.

www.collegegoals.com

Planning Your Summer with College in Mind

Are you a high school student (or the parent of one) who is wondering how best to spend your summer? What do colleges expect high school students to do during their school holidays? While summer is a great time to relax and recharge, it’s also an excellent opportunity for teenagers to show commitment, responsibility, passion, leadership and reflection – all characteristics that can really boost your chance of getting into a good college!

Summer Job
Having a summer job is a great way to get work experience and demonstrate commitment and responsibility. Colleges understand financial realities and are impressed by students who work, especially if they are saving money for college or helping to pay some of their own bills. According to an article by Jenny Anderson in Quartz magazine (6-19-16), “Any way you turn it, holding a job is one of the most important things an adolescent can do…. They have to get up in the morning, manage their time and money, pay taxes, and be responsible to a schedule that neither kid nor parent designed.”

See: Quartz “Teens should have summer jobs, the less glamorous the better
(June 19, 2016)

Internship
Like a job, internships involve working for a company or organization, preferably one related to your career interests; but, unlike a job, they are often unpaid. Internships provide an opportunity to ‘test the waters’ and see if you really are interested in that career path. They also help students develop strong teamwork skills balanced with individual responsibility, build specific job skills, and network with people in their field of interest.

See: PrepScholar “Complete Guide to Internships for High School Students
(December 4, 2015)

Volunteer Work
Volunteering is when you do unpaid work that benefits others. Ideally, you are doing work that you enjoy, that supports a cause you care about, and that allows you to explore a career interest. There are many places where you can volunteer locally, such as libraries, animal shelters, schools, community theatres, food pantries, or other local non-profits. My daughter, for example, volunteered at the Emergency Room of our local hospital, as a way to explore her interest in medicine. If you’re passionate about national or local politics, or environmental issues, get involved! Work for a candidate whose values best meet yours, learn about the issues that matter to you, to your community… read, write and talk about them.

See: OnlineSchools.org’s “Student Volunteering Guide

See: PrepScholar “The 9 Best Places to Do Community Service” (September 21, 2015)

Summer Classes
Summer classes can be taken in a variety of ways, either through your high school, at a community college, through an academic program at a college, or even online. Take a course in something that really interests you, but is not offered in your school, or community. Did you know that you can take online courses from Harvard, MIT, Berkeley, the U of Texas and other great institutions online, for FREE, through www.edX.org? And there are many other similar options through other institutions, including and beyond www.khanacademy.org. If you need to stay on track with high school courses in order to prepare for college, see what’s available in summer school or at your local community college. If you are interested in pursuing theater, dance or visual arts, see what kinds of workshops are available both locally or as a residential program elsewhere. There are also many ‘pay to play’ opportunities on college campuses, where you study interesting subjects with students from around the world, while living on a college campus. While doing such a program will not improve your chances of admission at that college, it is a great opportunity to explore subjects not available at your high school, meet new people, demonstrate leadership, explore the college experience and expand the horizons of your world!

See: Forbes “College Summer Programs for High Schoolers: Are They Worth It?
(July 1, 2015)

See: Fastweb! Summer Programs for High School Students (March 1, 2016)

Pursue Hobbies or Talents
Summer is the time to pursue hobbies and talents, informally or formally. Perhaps you want to cook your way through one of Julia Child’s legendary cookbooks! It could result in a great college application essay! Are you an athletic, hoping to pursue your sport in college? Summer is an opportunity to focus intensively on your sport, by training or attending camps. Maybe you love to sit around playing guitar, writing your own songs, singing… great! Work on them, polish them, record them, maybe even YouTube them!

See: Psychology Today “Six Reasons to Get a Hobby” (September 15, 2015)

Your summer activities are more important than you imagine… NOT because you can rack up an impressive list to report on your college applications of the activities you attended, participated in, witnessed or accomplished. More important is that you are exploring the things that really mean something to you, and you’re investing your energy in excelling in them! With many opportunities available, choose ones that interest you and will communicate your passion to colleges. Colleges want to see that you committed to activities that are meaningful to you, in which you displayed responsibility and leadership, and where you both affected and were affected by the people and community around you.

See: Huffington Post’s “What College Admissions Office Look for in Extracurricular Activities” (April 11, 2013)

And don’t forget – bagging groceries, flipping burgers, doing construction work or restoring trails will be at least as respected by admission officers as attending a 2-week campus-based program.

Finally, remember that summers are probably the best time for you and your family to make the effort to visit a range of campuses, so you don’t waste time or money applying to colleges where you won’t be happy. Do NOT leave campus visits until after you get admitted… visiting campuses demonstrates your interest in each college, and that effort can significantly affect the outcome of your application.

Don’t wait! Summer opportunities need to be lined up NOW!

Is Early Decision Right For You?

Early applications were initially intended to help students signal their commitment to their top choice school. Over time though, the early application system began to reproduce all the stresses and strains of regular decision, only earlier and for an extended application period.  Now there are a variety of early application choices: Early Action (open choice and single choice), Early Decision, and second round Early Decision applications. Early Decision and Early Action application deadlines are usually in November, and students are typically notified of the admission decision in December.  Each early application option offers pros and cons.

This blog focuses on Early Decision (ED) applications.  An ED application is a binding commitment to one school. If accepted, you will be expected to attend, and thus you must withdraw any other applications.

Applying early can be an effective admissions strategy for many students. It is most appropriate for a student who:

  • Has researched colleges extensively
  • Is absolutely sure that the college is their first choice
  • Has found a college that is a strong match academically, socially and geographically
  • Meets or exceeds the admission profile for the college with respect to standardized test scores, GPA and class rank
  • Has an academic record that has been solid over time

Early Decision may be less appropriate for students who will absolutely need financial aid to attend college and will benefit from comparing financial aid offers from other colleges, unless your first choice college is one of the colleges that pledges to meet 100% of a student’s demonstrated financial need.  (See: http://www.thecollegesolution.com/schools-that-meet-100-of-financial-need-2/.)

More and more, colleges are accepting an increasing proportion of their incoming freshman class through Early Decision (ED) applications.  Click here (https://ogontz.files.wordpress.com/2016/08/2016-early-decision-vs-regular-decision-acceptance-rates-chart-8-21-16.pdf) for a document that compares ED acceptance rates to Regular Decision (RD) acceptance rates for over 200 American colleges and universities. The document also gives the percentage of each institution’s freshman class filled through ED.  You will note that many prominent colleges fill 1/3 to 1/2 or even more with ED applicants, which significantly reduces the number of spaces available for the much larger pool of students who apply Regular Decision.

It’s important to reiterate that you should apply early only if you are as ready to present your credentials to the college in October or November as you would be later in the fall. If you want to re-take the SAT or ACT you didn’t do so well on, or get your History grade up, you might want to forgo applying early in order to buy yourself some more time for improvement until the regular admissions deadline.

If you plan on applying early, you need to start all facets of your admissions process early. Make sure you have lined up your recommendations and completed all required testing before the deadlines. Be ready to present yourself as a solid candidate. Above all, make sure you indeed want to attend the school to which you are applying early.

For more information about Early Decision, see:

http://blog.prepscholar.com/what-is-early-decision-should-you-do-it

http://www.thecollegesolution.com/applying-to-college-early-decision/

By Carolyn Stewart

Start Your College Financial Aid Process NOW

As you are excitedly exploring college websites and imagining yourselves as incoming freshmen next year on the campuses of your choice, many of you (and your parents!) are probably also concerned about the rising cost of college attendance.

There are two options that can help families in facing the cost of college – merit scholarship aid and need-based financial aid. Students/families should consider applying for both. Merit scholarships are awarded to students based on their talents and not on financial need. These talents may include athletics, academics, musical skills or commitment to service. Merit-based money is a measure of how much a college would like a student to attend and is unaffected by the wealth or the need of the student’s family. Many of the most selective private colleges, however, do not award any merit-based aid. Need-based aid is based on a calculation of a family’s demonstrated need. In other words, the cost of attending a college minus the estimated contribution a family can make to cover that cost (EFC) = demonstrated need.

If you think you will need financial assistance in order to attend the college of your choice, there are things you and your parents should do now to prepare for the process of applying for financial aid.

  1. Start gathering and organizing your financial documents and tax information now. Beginning in 2016 for aid applications for the 2017-2018 award year, families will use the prior prior year (PPY) income and tax return information. This is great news, since most families should have their 2015 tax returns already submitted. Use this 2015 income and tax return information on the Net Price Calculators described below and to complete the FAFSA and CSS Profile in a timely manner.
  1. All colleges and universities are required to put a Net Price Calculator on their websites to help families calculate their estimated family contribution (EFC), given the specific costs of that institution. You can also find a general net price calculator on the College Board’s website at http://netpricecalculator.collegeboard.org/.
  1. The Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) is the online application used by U.S. citizens and permanent residents to apply for financial aid from the U.S. federal and state governments. It is used by colleges and universities to distribute need-based financial aid. It is also used by many institutions to award scholarships and merit-based aid. It is important to complete the FAFSA even if you don’t think you will qualify for financial aid! 

    International students are not eligible for the U.S. government aid programs. However, many schools will ask international students to submit a FAFSA so that they may use the data for assessing financial need. See eduPASS (http://www.edupass.org/finaid/fafsa.phtml) for more information.Beginning in 2016, the FAFSA will be available starting October 1. Complete the FAFSA as soon as possible after October 1. You can download instructions, worksheets and other information about completing the FAFSA at https://studentaid.ed.gov/sa/resources#complete. The switch to PPY data will allow most American families to use the IRS Data Retrieval Tool within the FAFSA, thereby simplifying the application process. Information from the parents’ PPY tax return (normally already submitted to the IRS – 2015 return in this case) would be downloaded and automatically populate the FAFSA. If your student is applying Early Decision (ED), you will likely need to submit the FAFSA at the same time or shortly after the ED application has been submitted. Check each college’s website for deadlines.

  1. Check to see if the institutions on your list require the CSS Profile, in addition to the FAFSA. There are about 200 colleges (mostly highly-selective private colleges) that use this form, which is longer and more complex than the FAFSA. Both U.S. and international students may complete the CSS Profile. We recommend printing out the CSS Profile worksheet (accessible once you establish a CSS Profile account) and filling it in by hand, before transferring the data to the online application. The CSS Profile is also available starting October 1 and will use PPY income and tax information like the FAFSA. If your student is applying Early Decision (ED) to one of the institutions requiring the CSS Profile, you will likely need to submit the CSS Profile at the same time or shortly after the ED application has been submitted. Check each college’s website for deadlines.
  1. If you think you will need assistance with FAFSA or CSS Profile preparation, contact a financial aid expert EARLY, preferably in the Fall and definitely not last minute!
  1. Start exploring scholarship opportunities, both locally and nationally. These are sources of funding that are not administered by colleges but rather by other private organizations, each with its own application process and eligibility criteria. Families should not pay for any of these, nor pay anyone to search them out! Check out this website: http://www.college-scholarships.com/free-scholarship-searches/. Before you spend lots of time applying for scholarships, check with the colleges on your list. Many schools will deduct your scholarships from your awarded financial aid package.

This process can feel overwhelming….. I know, because I have completed the process for both my children! But by starting the process now, getting organized, and having a frank discussion with your family about expectations and financial realities, you will be ready to complete all the relevant forms when the time comes. And, when you have completed the paperwork, reward yourself for your accomplishment!

Written by Carolyn Stewart, Director of Communications

Summer Reading Suggestions

Every year, College Goals suggests interesting books for you – both students and parents – to consider for your weekend and holiday reading! This year, our counselors have been reading a wide variety of genres, encompassing many topics, eras and styles. Their recommendations are included below.

So, look for these titles and grab a book to take with you on vacation!

Andrea van Niekerk’s Recommendations

Mary Norris, Between You and Me: Confessions of a Comma Queen. Norris worked for decades in The New Yorker’s copy department, and this is both a memoir of her time there and a very funny look at language and the ways we use it.

Janna Levin, Black Hole Blues, and other Songs from Outer Space. Levin’s timing was either very terrible or really prescient! Earlier this year scientists for the first time recorded the sound of black holes colliding, confirming Einstein’s general theory of relativity. This books chronicles the search for those sounds and came out right as scientists announced that they had recorded them. (If you want to read a great lay article about the actual discovery, have a look at: http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/gravitational-waves-discovered-from-colliding-black-holes1/)

We have lots of conversations about the ways in which knowledge intersects across subject – the intersection, for example, between politics, economics and technological change. Kenneth Pomeranz and Steven Topik’s book, The World That Trade Created: Society, Culture and the World Economy, 1400 to Present Third Edition) uses trade as one way to understand the way our world has come about. Feels a bit like a textbook, but it is an easy read and every chapter is almost its own little book.

Finally, summer is a great time to pick up a page-turner and remind yourself why reading is fabulous and fun! So over the last few months my husband and I have, at our son’s recommendation, consumed James Corey’s Expanse series, from Leviathan Awakes to Nemesis Games. Obviously it helps if you like science fiction, but this does so well in creating a future world – one in which spaceships take us far beyond our home world, but the experience is dangerous, cramped, and has a big impact on the socio-economic life on Earth.

Frans de Waal is a Dutch primatologist who studies animal intelligence. His book Are We Smart Enough to Know How Smart Animals Are? is a great book for anyone interested in the science of cognition, and a wonderful read for all of us who love to read great stories about animals doing weirdly smart things on the internet.

Jilly Warner’s Recommendations, including some from her students!

In Emily Henry’s debut effort, The Love That Split the World weaves Native American folktales into this time-traveling, gripping, and beautifully-written love story.

Paper Hearts by Meg Viviott: Amid the brutality of Auschwitz during the Holocaust, a forbidden gift helps two teenage girls find hope, friendship, and the will to live in this novel in verse that’s based on a true story.

In Passenger by Alexandra Bracken, Etta, a talented teenage violinist in New York City, goes, in a matter of moments, from making her concert soloist debut to finding herself prisoner aboard a ship in the distant past. It turns out she is descended from one of a dwindling number of time-traveling families who manipulate history in an ongoing fight for power and influence. The captain of the ship, Nicholas Carter, was hired to retrieve Etta and bring her to the head of the most powerful family.

North Face by Matt Dickinson: An earthquake, a climber trapped on Everest and an epic rescue attempt.

The Tears of the Rajas by Ferdinand Mount is a sweeping history of the British in India, seen through the experiences of a single Scottish family. This was a period in which my grandparents lived in India, and I found this fascinating read both beautiful and horrific.

Joyce Reed’s Recommendations

In Revolution in Education: How a Small Band of Innovators Will Make College Accessible and Affordable, Richard A. DeMillo tells the behind-the-scenes story of the pioneering efforts to transform higher education and introduce new ways to disseminate knowledge.

Educator Salman Khan founded the Khan Academy with the aim of providing a “free, world-class education for anyone, anywhere.” In The One World Schoolhouse, he presents his radical vision for the future of education, as well as his own remarkable story.

How many introverts do you know? The real answer will probably surprise you! In Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking, author Susan Cain explores introversion through psychological research old and new, personal experiences, and even brain chemistry, in an engaging and highly-readable fashion.

In Where You Go Is Not Who You’ll Be, bestselling author and columnist Frank Bruni provides a new perspective on the flawed and competitive process of college admissions and a path out of the anxiety that it provokes.

Gail Lewis’ Recommendations

All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr: Somehow this WWII novel captures something special about the time and terror of this major world event, blending the experiences of a young, scientifically-oriented German boy and a young French girl who happens to be blind. It’s amazingly successful and well worth reading. A book that one finds oneself thinking about a lot after completing it . . . one of the markers of a great book, in my opinion. A straight-forward yet engaging read.

In his non-fiction bestseller The Big Short, Michael Lewis describes the build-up of the U.S. housing bubble during the 2000s that led to the financial crisis of 2007-2008, telling the story with dark humor.

With exclusive access to Musk, his family and friends, journalist Ashlee Vance provides the first inside look into the extraordinary life and times of Silicon Valley’s most audacious entrepreneur in Elon Musk: Tesla, SpaceX, and the Quest for a Fantastic Future.

Improv Wisdom: don’t prepare, just show up by Patricia Madsen: In an irresistible invitation to lighten up, look around, and live an unscripted life, a master of the art of improvisation explains how to adopt the attitudes and techniques used by generations of musicians and actors.

With their trademark blend of captivating storytelling and unconventional analysis, Steven Levitt and Stephen Dubner of Freakonomics fame take us inside their thought process and teach us all how to think a bit more productively, more creatively, more rationally. In Think Like A Freak, they offer a blueprint for an entirely new way to solve problems, whether your interest lies in minor lifehacks or major global reforms.

David Prutow’s Recommendations
The Overachievers: The Secret Lives of Driven Kids by Alexandra Robbins: In this engrossing anthropological study of the cult of overachieving that is prevalent in many middle- and upper-class schools, journalist Robbins follows the lives of students from a Bethesda, Md., high school as they balanced intense academic pressure, parental expectations, personal interests, social life, and their own drive to succeed.

Author and lawyer Bryan Stevenson spent decades defending the poor and disadvantaged within the U.S. criminal justice system. A memoir of sorts, Just Mercy: A story of Justice and Redemption contains stories from children, teen and adults who have been in the prison system. This is a book for anyone interested in social justice, the law, and the death penalty.

In Freedom, author Jonathan Franzen paints a wrenching, funny, and forgiving portrait of a Midwestern family. When Patty and Walter Berglund’s teenage son moves in with their conservative neighbors and their perfect life in St. Paul begins to unravel, out spill family secrets–clandestine loves, lies, compromises, and failures.

Carolyn Stewart’s Recommendations

The Rosie Project by Graeme Simsion: Full of heart and humor, Simsion’s debut novel about a fussy, socially-challenged man’s search for the perfect wife is smart, breezy, quirky, and fun. Genetics professor Don Tillman’s ordered, predictable life is thrown into chaos when love enters the equation in this immensely enjoyable novel.

In the spirit of The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society and The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry, Gabrielle Zevin’s enchanting novel The Storied Life of A.J. Fikry is a love letter to the joys of books, reading and booksellers.  The protagonist, bookstore owner A.J. Fikry has seen everything he loves disappear. This novel, in its humor and sadness, shows how he rebuilds with the help of an endearing family.

In Jumpha Lahiri’s eloquent debut collection of short stories Interpreter of Maladies, the characters navigate between the Indian traditions they’ve inherited and the baffling new world, seeking love beyond the barriers of culture and generations.

As a former college rower, I really enjoyed reading The Boys in the Boat by Daniel James Brown. It’s the true story of the working-class men who formed the University of Washington’s crew team and their unlikely journey to defeat not only the elite teams of the East Coast and Great Britain, but also the German rowing team of Hitler’s Olympics.

College Fairs – Spring/Summer 2016

Making the Most of a College FairWe have compiled information on several college tour groups and college fairs traveling during Spring/Summer 2016. Please click on the links to find out if a college/university that you are interested in will be traveling to an area near you. Also, please be sure to check with your school’s college admission counselor, your local newspaper, or the admission offices of colleges that interest you to find out if, when and where a representative may be presenting information at a college fair near you.

Attending college fairs and meeting representatives of colleges that you are considering is valuable for “demonstrating interest” in those colleges. These can be critically important opportunities for personal interaction with the admission officer who will be responsible for applications from your area . . . so make the effort to have a brief but memorable meeting. Then, follow-up the brief over-the-table interaction with a personal email.

NACAC Spring 2016 National College Fair
Parents and students participating in the free National College Fairs meet one-on-one with representatives from colleges and universities to discuss admission and financial aid opportunities at their respective institutions. Fairs are held between February 28 and May 23 in the following states: FL, NY, GA, SC, MI, NC, CT, MA, RI, TX, NE, HI, OH, TN, MD, CA, NJ, BC. Check the website for the specific schedule. Register before the fair to make the most of your time onsite and ensure that colleges can follow up with you. (http://www.gotomyncf.com/Registration/EventSelectForState?stateName=All)

Coast to Coast College Tour, Spring 2016
Dartmouth College, Northwestern University, Princeton University, University of California-Berkeley, and Vanderbilt University collaborate on a series of events across the country designed to educate students and parents on selective admission, financial aid, and the common admission philosophy shared among the five institutions. Students and parents are encouraged to take this opportunity to speak informally with admission representatives as well as to explore the defining characteristics of each school. Locations and dates have not yet been announced. Click on the link (http://www.coasttocoasttour.org) for more information and to register.

Colleges That Change Lives
Each Colleges That Change Lives program begins with a 30-minute panel presentation on completing a college search today, sharing the latest research on specific campus characteristics and learning components that lead to the most successful college experience. Immediately after the panel presentation, the college fair begins, lasting approximately 1.5 hours. See the website for participating colleges. The US tour will visit the following states between May 14 and August 31: GA, TX, NJ, MD, DC, MA, NC, IL, CO, NY, CA, TN, MN, PA, AZ, OR, WA, MO. (http://ctcl.org/info-sessions/)

Exploring Educational Excellence
Join Brown, Chicago, Columbia, Cornell and Rice for an information session for prospective students and their families. Sessions include a brief overview of each institution, information on admissions and financial aid, and a chance to speak informally with admissions representatives. Information sessions will be held in CA, TX, MN, MI, IN, IL, MO, FL, GA, NC, VA, MD, PA, NJ, and NY between April 24 and June 5. See the website for more information and to register: http://www.exploringeducationalexcellence.org/index.php

8 of the Best Colleges
Claremont McKenna, Colorado College, Connecticut College, Grinnell College, Haverford College, Kenyon College, Macalester College, and Sarah Lawrence College invite students and families to learn more about these eight internationally recognized liberal arts colleges.  Receptions will be held between May 15-19 in five cities: Chicago, IL, Minneapolis, MN, Denver, CO, Phoenix, AZ, and San Diego, CA. http://8ofthebestcolleges.org/index.html

Jesuit Excellence Tour (JET)
The Jesuit Excellence Tour (JET) is a series of recruitment events that take place throughout each academic year in twenty metro areas across the country. These events allow admissions staffs at Jesuit colleges and universities to jointly recruit targeted areas. Meanwhile, students who participate in the JET programs are provided simultaneous access to a number of Jesuit institutions, to which some of the students may not have had previous exposure. Check out the website (http://www.ajcunet.edu/institutions?Page=DTN-20130516094401) to download an informational packet about each of the 28 Jesuit institutions and for the tour schedule, which goes from January 25 to May 27.

Exploring College Options
This is a special recruitment program sponsored by the undergraduate admissions offices of Duke, Georgetown, Harvard, the University of Pennsylvania, and Stanford. Registration for Spring 2016 events will be available in the end of March. Please click on the link and then move your mouse over the state you are interested in to find the locations within that state, and the dates and times.  Online registration is available (http://www.exploringcollegeoptions.org/). Recruitment travel to Central and South America will be conducted during May 2016 (https://uadmissions.georgetown.edu/visiting/your-area/international-cities).

The Claremont Colleges Information Sessions
The Claremont Colleges will host an information session by admission representatives from Claremont McKenna, Harvey Mudd, Pitzer, Pomona, and Scripps Colleges. Admission officers will discuss the benefits of attending each individual college, as well as the advantages of participating in one of the strongest and most cohesive college consortia in the nation. The program will include a media presentation, individual college information presentations, a general question-and-answer session, and time at the end of the program for you to speak individually with each college. Check the website (http://www.cmc.edu/admission/ccr.php) for a schedule of Claremont Colleges receptions and registration information. Upcoming receptions will be held in early April in DC, New York City and Boston.

Study Life USA
Student education fairs give you a chance to speak directly with representatives of US universities, language programs and summer schools. Click on this link for a list of international education fairs taking place during Spring 2016 in Latin America, Europe, Northeast Asia, Southeast Asia, and Middle East: http://studyusa.com/en/a/195/education-fairs.

Technology Camps in the UK

Skills in programming, engineering, design, and digital arts have become critical components of a young person’s education in the 21st century! We would like to share with you the upcoming course schedule for the Easter/April and summer holidays at Fire Tech Camp in the UK: https://www.firetechcamp.com/.

Fire Tech Camp teaches young people to create and innovate through technology. Through a variety of course offerings, children aged 9 to 17 are exposed to the inner workings of the games and tech world with hands-on experience in game and smartphone app development, coding, and robotics.

Fire Tech Camp’s flagship location is at Imperial College in London, but courses are also offered at other high-tech, quality venues across the UK, including Bristol, Cambridge, Reading, Manchester, Wycombe Abbey in Buckinghamshire, and Sedbergh School in Cumbria.

Fire Tech Camp offers fun and innovative holiday camps, weekend courses and workshops. Please share this information with your family and friends, so the word can get out about this exciting educational opportunity in the UK.

College Goals is Traveling to the UK and Europe!

Joyce Reed, founder of College Goals, and Andrea van Niekerk, College Goals’ university admission counselor, will be traveling to the UK and Europe in March. They will offer overview presentations regarding university admission processes for students and parents who are considering US as well as UK university enrollment.

Both counselors spent over a decade in high-ranking positions at a selective American university: Joyce Reed as Associate Dean of The College at Brown University and Andrea van Niekerk as Associate Director of Admission and freshman academic advisor also at Brown University. Now, through College Goals, they help students identify appropriate institutions and create successful applications to institutions in the US, UK and Canada.

Our colleague, Jilly Warner, will be returning to the UK and Europe in the autumn to give presentations and meet with clients and prospective families. Jilly was born, raised and educated in the UK, France and Austria, and has over a decade of university-based experience directing international admissions at the University of Vermont, before becoming an independent college counselor with College Goals. She now works with domestic and international students from many parts of the world.

Given how late international students frequently approach the American application process, we particularly urge families with students in Years 10 or 11, Troisième or Seconde, or Grades 9 or 10 to attend one of these sessions and to begin thoughtful and informed consideration of their higher education options now, prior to when their student starts A-Levels, Pre-Us, French BAC or IB coursework.

The presentations in March will answer the following questions: what do families need to know for success in the university search and application process? How can students prepare for their required standardized tests and do their best on the applications? How do you make all your preparations come together in a strong US university application?

London 2016        Paris 2016

There will also be opportunities to meet privately with Joyce or Andrea in London or in Paris. Joyce will also be travelling to Zurich to meet with families.

All events are free of charge.

My Tips for Surviving the College Application Process

By Emily I. from Berlin, Germany
Guest Blogger and College Goals’ student of Jilly Warner

The idea of applying to colleges can seem exciting, daunting, maybe even scary, but most of all, stressful. Although it should actually only be exciting, as we begin this amazing new chapter in our lives, I feel that it is hard to get around the stressful part of applying. The only way to make it easier is to take each step of the process as it comes and just get it done. To get started early is important, in order to have enough time to dissect each step of the process and work on it thoroughly.

To me, the most important part of the application process is having motivation and excitement. You have to be excited to go to college, and to start the wonderful experience of life after high school. If you are not, it may be very hard to find motivation to write essays, look into different kinds of schools, and keep up with your studies at the same time. Motivation and excitement came easy for me, as I have always dreamed of going to college in the US.

It helped to look at the websites of individual schools, and find one thing for each school that I was completely passionate about. This also helped when comparing different choices, as I could weigh the aspects I had found amazing about one school to the highlights of another.

During the process of deciding where to apply, I began writing my Common App essay. Again, the most important things to have are motivation and passion. Choose a prompt that you are interested in and brainstorm about what information you find important to share about yourself. This will help a great deal, as it will not be a burden to write and you may even find the process enjoyable. Going over it repeatedly will get boring, so I tried to always keep in mind why I initially felt inclined to write an essay in response to that specific prompt and why I was excited about it. If you simply can’t get motivated, think about your dream school. Imagine their admissions team reading your essay and what impressions they will gather from it. You want it to stand out, right?

Once I had made my final choice of colleges, I began writing the individual essays for each school. Again, if you get a choice of prompts, choose one that you are passionate about. Many of the essays took a lot of thinking and mulling over in my mind until I was able to decide what I wanted to write about. The University of Richmond, for example, has a prompt that simply says: Spiders. I felt completely clueless about how to respond, as I felt that such a creative prompt deserved a very creative answer. I was really happy that I had started early, because I had enough time to take a week to just think about it. I tried to think about it at least once a day, and if any good ideas popped into my head, I immediately wrote them down on my phone. This is a good thing to do with any prompts that seem tricky. It is a lot easier to have a whole bunch of ideas and then weed out the good ones, instead of staring at a blank computer screen with no ideas to consider.

Once I had finished writing all the individual essays, everything else seemed like a piece of cake. The best advice I can give to anyone about to go through the process of applying to colleges is to get on it early and stay focused, and most importantly, be motivated and get excited. It is the first time for most of us to be independent from our families and to make all of our own decisions. No matter where you end up going to college, you should be excited about the unknown, and use that anticipation for a boost of energy and motivation.

Important Changes to the Financial Aid Process

For many families, one of the most stressful aspects of the college application process is filling out financial aid forms.  Recent changes to both the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) and CSS Profile should make the process somewhat easier starting October 2016, but if your student is a current high school senior, college freshman or college sophomore, there are some things to consider before the end of 2015.

Currently, the CSS Profile becomes available on October 1 and the FAFSA goes live on January 1. Parents must complete these online forms using prior year financial data. (So, for students beginning college in the 2016-2017 academic year, this would be 2015 data.)  This has meant that parents of college applicants have had to estimate tax income information in order to meet the financial aid application deadlines.

This autumn, changes were announced for both the FAFSA and CSS Profile.  Beginning in 2016 for aid applications for the 2017-2018 award year, families will use the prior prior year (PPY) income and tax return information, and both forms will be available on October 1, 2016.  This means that parents of students who will be in college in the fall of 2017, for example, will use their 2015 federal tax return to complete the FAFSA and CSS Profile.

This will make the financial aid application process easier for the following reasons:

  • PPY will allow students to file their FAFSA and CSS Profile much earlier and align more closely with traditional application process deadlines.
  • PPY will allow most American families to use the IRS Data Retrieval Tool within the FAFSA, thereby eliminating the need for parents to estimate income and tax information and decreasing the need for additional documentation. Information from the parents’ PPY tax return (already submitted to the IRS) would be downloaded and automatically populate the FAFSA.
  • PPY may enable families to receive notification of financial aid packages earlier, which will provide more time for students and families to assess and compare packages and determine how they will pay their Expected Family Contribution (EFC).

So why is this change important now, when it doesn’t take effect until October 2016?

Because of the timing of the change, parents with current high school seniors, college freshmen, and college sophomores will complete the FAFSA and CSS Profile using 2015 financial data TWO YEARS IN A ROW.  This means now is the time to look at your 2015 data carefully and see what steps you can take to lower your expected family contribution by reducing parental income and/or assets or deferring decisions that would inflate your income and/or assets.  Consider the timing of a bonus, distributions from your retirement plans, realization of capital gains from selling assets, and purchase of large item for which you have been accumulating funds.

Here are some articles to read for further information:

Get Ready for FAFSA

The new FAFSA process and college costs